Muslims around world celebrate Eid as hajj enters final days

People gather to attend Eid al-Adha prayers in Sale, north of Rabat, Morocco, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. The festival commemorates the story of Abraham and his readiness to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God, who provided a lamb to be used instead. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)
Small children stand among men attending Eid al-Adha prayers, held in a sports hall in Bucharest, Romania, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. Muslims worldwide are celebrating Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice, which commemorates the biblical story of Abraham and his readiness to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God, by sacrificial killing of sheep, goats, cows or camels. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
A muslim faithful prays during the Eid al-Adha holiday at the Selimiye mosque, until the 16th century known as the Cathedral of St Sophia, or Agia Sofia, in the Turkish Cypriots breakaway area at northern divided capital of Nicosia, Cyprus, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. The Eid al-Adha holiday, or "Feast of Sacrifice," commemorate Ibrahim's test of faith when God commanded him to sacrifice his only son Ismail. Ibrahim was prepared to submit to the command, but then God stayed his hand, sparing his son. For the holiday, Muslims slaughter livestock and distribute the meat to the poor. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
Women watch from a separate section as men take part in Eid al-Adha prayers, held in a sports hall in Bucharest, Romania, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. Muslims worldwide are celebrating Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice, which commemorates the biblical story of Abraham and his readiness to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God, by sacrificial killing of sheep, goats, cows or camels. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
Muslim pilgrims attend noon prayers outside the Namirah mosque on Arafat Mountain, during the annual hajj pilgrimage, outside the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
A girl waits at a fence to receive some meat from a slaughter on the first day of Eid al-Adha in Kabul, Afghanistan, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. Muslims around the world will celebrate Eid al-Adha in local language, the Festival of Sacrifice, to mark the end of the hajj pilgrimage by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini)
Butchers prepare to slaughter a caw, on the first day of Eid al-Adha, or Feast of Sacrifice, outside their shop in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha by sacrificing animals to commemorate the prophet Ibrahim's faith in being willing to sacrifice his son. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
Muslim pilgrims hold umbrellas as they attend noon prayers outside the Namirah mosque on Arafat Mountain, during the annual hajj pilgrimage, outside the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
A man skins sheep slaughtered to celebrate Eid al-Adha in Vlakovo near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. Muslims worldwide are celebrating Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice, which commemorates the biblical story of Abraham and his readiness to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God, by sacrificial killing of sheep, goats, cows or camels. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
A child holds a toy standing in the women's section before Eid al-Adha prayers, held in a sports hall in Bucharest, Romania, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. Muslims worldwide are celebrating Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice, which commemorates the biblical story of Abraham and his readiness to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God, by sacrificial killing of sheep, goats, cows or camels. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
People drag sheep for slaughter to celebrate Eid al-Adha, in Vlakovo near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. Muslims worldwide are celebrating Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice, which commemorates the biblical story of Abraham and his readiness to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God, by sacrificial killing of sheep, goats, cows or camels. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
A father holds his son as they attend Eid al-Adha prayers in Sale, north of Rabat, Morocco, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. The festival commemorates the story of Abraham and his readiness to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God, who provided a lamb to be used instead. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)
Girls buy toy jewelry from a vendor on the first day of Eid al-Adha in Kabul, Afghanistan, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. Muslims around the world will celebrate Eid al-Adha in local language, the Festival of Sacrifice, to mark the end of the hajj pilgrimage by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini)
Men drag sheep for slaughter to celebrate Eid al-Adha, in Vlakovo near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. Muslims worldwide are celebrating Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice, which commemorates the biblical story of Abraham and his readiness to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God, by sacrificial killing of sheep, goats, cows or camels. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
Bosnian Muslims skin sheep slaughtered to celebrate Eid al-Adha in Vlakovo near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. Muslims worldwide are celebrating Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice, which commemorates the biblical story of Abraham and his readiness to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God, by sacrificial killing of sheep, goats, cows or camels. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
Girls of the Romanian Muslim community flash V-signs before Eid al-Adha prayers, held in a sports hall in Bucharest, Romania, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. Muslims worldwide are celebrating Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice, which commemorates the biblical story of Abraham and his readiness to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God, by sacrificial killing of sheep, goats, cows or camels. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
Muslim pilgrims attend noon prayers outside the Namirah mosque on Arafat Mountain, during the annual hajj pilgrimage, outside the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
An man watches a butcher as he cuts a sheep, on the first day of Eid al-Adha, or Feast of Sacrifice, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha by sacrificing animals to commemorate the prophet Ibrahim's faith in being willing to sacrifice his son. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

MINA, Saudi Arabia — Muslims around the world are celebrating the Eid al-Adha holiday on Friday as some 2 million Muslim pilgrims carry out the final rites of the annual hajj in Saudi Arabia.

Hundreds of thousands of pilgrims made their way toward a massive multi-story complex in Mina after dawn on Friday to cast pebbles at three large columns. It is here where Muslims believe the devil tried to talk the Prophet Ibrahim out of submitting to God's will.

Muslims believe Ibrahim's faith was tested when God commanded him to sacrifice his only son Ismail. Ibrahim was prepared to submit to the command, but then God stayed his hand, sparing his son. In the Christian and Jewish version of the story, Abraham is ordered to kill his other son, Isaac.

The final days of hajj coincide with the Eid al-Adha holiday, or "Feast of Sacrifice," to commemorate Ibrahim's test of faith. For the holiday, Muslims slaughter livestock and distribute the meat to the poor.

For the final three days of hajj, pilgrims sleep in a large tent valley called Mina and for three days take part in a symbolic stoning of the devil. Mina is also where more than 2,400 people were killed two years ago in a stampede and a collision of two crowds that crushed people under the force.

The Saudi government has since widened some roads in Mina to try and improve the safety of the hajj. More than 100,000 security forces are managing the hajj this year, assisting pilgrims and directing the massive crowds that move from one location to another in the areas around Mecca for five days during the hajj. The Saudi government also offers all pilgrims free health care and access to hospitals during the hajj.

Most pilgrims will remain in Mina until Monday before completing the hajj. They will then circle the cube-shaped Kaaba in Mecca, Islam's most sacred site, before departing. The Kaaba represents the metaphorical house of God and the oneness of God in Islam. Observant Muslims around the world face toward the Kaaba during the five daily prayers.

The five-day-long hajj is a series of rituals meant to cleanse the soul of sins and instill a sense of equality and brotherhood among Muslims. The pilgrimage is required of all Muslims with the means to perform once in a lifetime.

During the last three days of hajj, male pilgrims shave their heads and remove the terrycloth white garments worn during the hajj. Women cut off a small lock of hair in a sign of spiritual rebirth and renewal.

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