Egyptian novel explores Christians under controlling church

In this Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018 photo, journalist and author Shady Lewis Botros, author of the book, "Ways of the Lord," poses for a portrait in London. The new Arabic-language novel, the author’s first, explores the lives of Egyptian Christians, dealing with discrimination but also a Church aligned with a state seeking to control them. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
In this Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018 photo, journalist and author Shady Lewis Botros, author of the book, "Ways of the Lord," poses for a portrait in London. The new Arabic-language novel, the author’s first, explores the lives of Egyptian Christians, dealing with discrimination but also a Church aligned with a state seeking to control them. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
In this Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018 photo, journalist and author Shady Lewis Botros poses with a copy of his book, "Ways of the Lord," in London. The new Arabic-language novel, the author’s first, explores the lives of Egyptian Christians, dealing with discrimination but also a Church aligned with a state seeking to control them. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
In this Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018 photo, journalist and author Shady Lewis Botros poses with a copy of his book, "Ways of the Lord," in London. The new Arabic-language novel, the author’s first, explores the lives of Egyptian Christians, dealing with discrimination but also a Church aligned with a state seeking to control them. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
In this Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018 photo, journalist and author Shady Lewis Botros, author of the book, "Ways of the Lord," poses for a portrait in London. The new Arabic-language novel, the author’s first, explores the lives of Egyptian Christians, dealing with discrimination but also a Church aligned with a state seeking to control them. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

CAIRO — A new Egyptian novel, entitled "Ways of the Lord," explores the lives of Egyptian Christians, dealing with discrimination but also a church aligned with a state seeking to control them.

The author, Shady Lewis Botros, says it can be viewed as an attempt to explain what it is like to be a Christian in Egypt.

The answer is given in stories narrated by the book's chief character. It's giving your children neutral names that don't identify them as Christians, facing baseless but dangerous charges of spying for Israel, or a family huddling in one room to escape the attention of a Muslim mob outside.

But beyond discrimination, it also explores what Botros says is the victimization of Egypt's Christians by a "politically engineered harmony" between the state and their church.

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